A Piece Of The Past, A Price In The Present: Paying For The Erie Canal

A Piece Of The Past, A Price In The Present: Paying For The Erie Canal

Business is growing for the New York State Marine Highway Transportation Company, according to co-founder Rob Goldman. His crew has found steady work towing barges of stone and sometimes oversized cargo like fighter planes along an expanded Erie Canal, also known as the New York State Barge Canal, that was completed in 1918.

“Let’s face it: a barge can’t deliver to your front door. A truck can,” Goldman admits. “But if we work with the trucks and we work with the rail, we can each be as efficient as possible and use as little fuel as possible because we’re efficient.”

New York’s entire canal system, including the Erie Canal, had revenues of $1.5 million in 2014 against $55 million to operate and maintain itself.

From Hansi Lo Wang/NPR.

With Citizens’ Help, Cities Can Build A Better Bike Lane — And More

With Citizens’ Help, Cities Can Build A Better Bike Lane — And More

As Burlington and other cities adopt the scrappy tactics of their citizens, they’ll need to show that they can make good on tactical urbanism’s original principles — to move faster, try new things, and not be afraid to fail.

Tactical urbanism. So it has a name.

From Laurel Wamsley/NPR.

Why Does The U.S. Have Bad Public Transit? Blame Class Warfare.

Why Does The U.S. Have Bad Public Transit? Blame Class Warfare.

What this all adds up to is workers who are less desperate and who have more options; which equals workers with more bargaining power; which equals more inconveniences and higher labor costs for the business owners, managers, and other professionals who make up much of the Republican base.

Good points, but too general an argument without digging deeper on specific transit systems (especially those that work well–i.e., Bay Area Rapid Transit).

[photo credit: tokyoform/flickr]

Density Yields Few Benefits If Sprawl Still Occurs

Aside from Quartz’s very misleading title, a recent study concluded that if cities increased density into their urban cores, there would still be few benefits to air quality if sprawl isn’t reduced as well.

Boston University study published on April 6 in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences shows that a major push in cities like Denver to build dense housing, better transit systems, and more bike lanes in their urban core doesn’t necessarily lead to lower per-capita CO2 emissions. That’s because suburbs continue to sprawl and residents there still drive to work.

Mass transit isn’t necessarily the answer to lower carbon emissions